Starting a lawn care business

Ric

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I already have most of the equipment (2 different trailers, weed eater, small backpack blower) Just looking to get whatever kind of mower i will need to get the job done.
From the way you started the thread it sounded like you didn't have any equipment and personally I think as I mentioned before, for the money the Cub Cadet LTX 1040 in a 42" cut is in the price range you quoted. You can check with Carscw here on the forum about the 1040, it's what he uses in his business and he drives the crap out of the thing. The thing about using a residential unit in business vs a commercial unit is it's up keep it's a continual maintenance machine.
 
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Ric

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Yep that's how I mow 50 houses a week and 3 commercial properties.. lol your version of professional and mine are similar our views on this business are completely different maybe different areas of the country means different ways to run our business but here I see my self as successful and professional and it doesn't matter what you think because I keep my customers lol

I am saying someone could start up with 1500 of equipment and advertising no this does not include a truck or licenses both of which will need to be taken care of. 1500 will get you your equipment, aggressive advertising and bidding will get you customers, and professionalism quality and reliability and experience will keep them. My biggest advise from someone who just started out is budget careful and keep stashing away as much savings as possible don't need to spring for top end equipment now save that for when you can afford a 1500 dollar lawnmower doesn't seem like a lot.
Mowing 50 houses a week doesn't make you a professional. Professionalism is conduct, good judgment, and polite behavior that is expected from a person who is trained or hired to do a job or for that fact anywhere he presents himself and you clearly don't show it here imo. Now I know you like to push my buttons and try to get me going with your rude comments towards me and it just shows your lack of professionalism imo.

I agree anyone can start a business with a minimal investment, sure that's a given but the problem is the greatest majority of those types of business end up going belly up in a short time because they can't compete with the professional across the street with 40 or 50k in equipment that can do a better job in less time for the same price as the start up business has to charge.
 

Lawnboy18

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Some very interestinh info on here! Even a little fight...
As for equipment, maybe you could get something like a 36"walk behind used on craiglist. The Toro Proline 36" is very popular and does a good job. I don't think you will be able to get anything fancy for 1500$, but it will get you started. Spend the less possible on useless stuff. Concentrate on buying equipment that will get your jobs done faster. The faster you go, the more clients you can get = $$$. Get yourself a budget also. Many people in America donnot have a budget. Even for there familly and that can cause many problems. Now, with a budget, you can control the inflow and outflow of your cash.

As for charging, it is your prices! Dont just phone other companies and ask them their prices and lower yours! You can surely phone to make sure your prices are not way out tho. To defend your price, you must stand out giving outstanding service with good equipment. You want to be looking on the job and show your clients you do this with pride and professionalism. Get some t-shorts also with your campany name!

Dont let the other companies discourage you! Also, get an accounting system to enter all expenses, and invoices. This can give you an idea on your profit margin.

Once you get real busy, maybe you could think about a helping pair of hands! It goes much faster and you are less exhausted at the end of the day.
 

Carscw

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Lots of good advice and some not so good. It's up to you to sort it out. As you notice not all of us do things the same way.

Your maintenance and repair skills play a big part in if you buy new or used.
The thing with buying used is you have to know what you are looking at.

If I was you I would look at a 38 or 42 walk behind.
If you want a new riding mower in the $1500 range I say the ltx 1040 I have beat on my like a red headed step child. But I am very obsessed with doing maintenance.

My feelings are that you need to up your budget and a commercial mower
 

jakesteel22

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Lots of good advice and some not so good. It's up to you to sort it out. As you notice not all of us do things the same way.

Your maintenance and repair skills play a big part in if you buy new or used.
The thing with buying used is you have to know what you are looking at.

If I was you I would look at a 38 or 42 walk behind.
If you want a new riding mower in the $1500 range I say the ltx 1040 I have beat on my like a red headed step child. But I am very obsessed with doing maintenance.

My feelings are that you need to up your budget and a commercial mower
thanks a lot! Im going to keep my eye out for some equipment on criagslist or something.
 

jakesteel22

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Some very interestinh info on here! Even a little fight...
As for equipment, maybe you could get something like a 36"walk behind used on craiglist. The Toro Proline 36" is very popular and does a good job. I don't think you will be able to get anything fancy for 1500$, but it will get you started. Spend the less possible on useless stuff. Concentrate on buying equipment that will get your jobs done faster. The faster you go, the more clients you can get = $$$. Get yourself a budget also. Many people in America donnot have a budget. Even for there familly and that can cause many problems. Now, with a budget, you can control the inflow and outflow of your cash.

As for charging, it is your prices! Dont just phone other companies and ask them their prices and lower yours! You can surely phone to make sure your prices are not way out tho. To defend your price, you must stand out giving outstanding service with good equipment. You want to be looking on the job and show your clients you do this with pride and professionalism. Get some t-shorts also with your campany name!

Dont let the other companies discourage you! Also, get an accounting system to enter all expenses, and invoices. This can give you an idea on your profit margin.

Once you get real busy, maybe you could think about a helping pair of hands! It goes much faster and you are less exhausted at the end of the day.
thanks a lot! very useful tips!
 

Fish

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I started a mowing business in the early 1980's, the same advice should apply here...

Of course back then, zero-turn models were very new and exclusive/expensive. So I started with a 36" Bunton Walk-Behind and a Shindaiwa t-25 trimmer, both top choices...

If I could do it over again it would have been the advertising areas/customer base......

I paid a bunch for a company to print up some fliers back then, no computers/printers back then, I had to hang the fliers on the doors as well.

But it pretty much boiled down to "WHERE" I hung the fliers, I hung them in "rich" neighborhoods as well as some old neighborhoods, and if I had it to do over......


RICH NEIGHBORHOODS!!!!!!!

I spent more time quibbling with old grandmas that grew up during the depression, then I did working on their lawns, and if I did, they wanted to argue about it...

Sad but true......
 
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Thats how I started out is with a $800 Craftsman lawn tractor, and kinda bought stuff as I went along that way the business pays for new better equipment as you go.
 

fatboy

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I started with a Troy-Bilt mower with Honda power the chassis will wear out before the engine does. I had an electric blower (a hundred foot cord) and a cheap weed whacker I bought off Craigslist for my own yard. Customers can be found advertising on craigslist.

Recently I have taken to making my own signs print your name number and logo on heavy cardstock, add two blank sheets of cardstock to make it sturdy. I use clear packaging tape to "laminate" the signs then staple them to a stake and post them at exits from subdivisions.

Good Luck
 
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I started with a Troy-Bilt mower with Honda power the chassis will wear out before the engine does. I had an electric blower (a hundred foot cord) and a cheap weed whacker I bought off Craigslist for my own yard. Customers can be found advertising on craigslist.

Recently I have taken to making my own signs print your name number and logo on heavy cardstock, add two blank sheets of cardstock to make it sturdy. I use clear packaging tape to "laminate" the signs then staple them to a stake and post them at exits from subdivisions.

Good Luck
I used to use the same concept for my yard sign. Packaging tape so it could stay outside. Just remember to start taping from the bottom so it's like shingles on a roof. But now that I had them done professionally (but for like $60:confused2:) I won't go back. But for small signs on a stake it's a great idea. :thumbsup:
 
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