Toro snowblower > starts, then dies

markdoyle

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Toro snowblower. Got it to 'start' - but it died within 10 seconds. Was able to prime and repeat this many times. If I pressed the 'priming' button while it was running for those few seconds - it would continue to run, but only when I pressed the 'prime' button. I took the snowblower apart and took the carburetor off - I didn't take it apart to where I was able to clean out the tiny pinholes, but enough where I sprayed cleaner all over it. Checked seals/gaskets - nothing appeared to be problematic. Here's my question - because I was able to keep it going by using the 'priming' button - does that suggest the fuel line / filter Is clogged? Or, could the carburetor still be bad - but it's able to run with the fuel from the priming button? Sorry if that's unclear, this was my first time taking any kind of engine apart and trying to figure things out.

Again, in short, the blower starts up fine - but quickly dies.
 

bertsmobile1

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When you are new to this and unable to recognise the different sounds & smells then the easiest thing to do is substitution.
So you could swap the carbs $$$$ or pinch the fuel tank from your push mower and hook that up to the carb ¢¢¢¢¢.
Problem goes away = fuel supply problem
Problem remains = carburettor problem.

IT will be of emense help to those who would offer you assisance if you could post the make & model number of the engine that is fitted.
If unsure some photos would be almost as helpful,
A cold day down here is 50 F so funny enough I don't see many snow blowers.
 

Scrubcadet10

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Most likely a clogged main jet in the carb.
As bert mentioned post engine make and model number
 

Rivets

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If you have one of the Toro single stage blowers built in the last five years, the most likely cause is a clogged idle jet. As stated post the model and serial numbers so we can see which carb you have.
 

markdoyle

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Wow - amazing to get this help. I should try the fuel line trick to rule it out / rule it in. The blower is two-cycle (oil/gas blend) - so I don't know if I could hook up my mower to it. But I may be able to figure out another way to feed gas into it from a different tube. Here are the details I could find on the blower:

Toro PowerClear P-Tek 2-cycle 141cc / 21"
Briggs / Stratton
Family: 8BSXS, 1415AA
Model: 0842320121E8
SN: 0808077828367

Also, I found some writing on the carburetor - Walbro 801167 28 821 (I have to double check - because when I google that - I'm not pulling up a specific part)

If the carb part is relatively inexpensive - it might make the most sense to buy a new one and swap it out. I've watched some videos about cleaning out the pinholes - and (a) I wasn't able to figure out how to take the carb apart well enough to find those and (b) the video showed some wires - but also some ultrasonic cleaner where you immerse the carb into a liquid solution and I don't have anything like that. At the same time, I'm excited to finally take the thing apart rather than spend $200 to take it into our lawn service store (who are great - no complaints - but would rather not spend the money, and learn how to fix it myself - whether it's replace or clean). Anyway, thanks again for the help - If this gives you any other ideas, I'm all ears.
 

Rivets

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With that carb I would clean and rebuild it with carb kit number 801427 and new float number 801422. This is the procedure I use.
Needle and seat replacement.
Remove the carb, and then remove the float bowl. Check the float bowl jet (which is the bowl screw) and make sure the jets both horizontal and vertical are clean and open. Tip the carb upside down and remove the float pin and float with needle attached. Look in the float needle passage and you should see the red float seat at the bottom of the passage. This is where a #5 crotchet hook would come in handy as you need to remove this seat. If you have no hook, but compressed air, you can blow through the fuel inlet and try to pop the seat out. Put your thumb over the passage to prevent the seat from flying who knows where. No air or hook try bending a stiff paper clip to dig the seat out.
I would either give the carb a good 24 hour soaking or have it ultrasonically cleaned at this time.
With the seat out clean the passage way with carb cleaner. Now you must find a drill bit slightly smaller than the passage way, to be used to press in the new seat. Apply a very, very small amount of a very light lube to the new seat. 3-1 oil or lighter, to help seat it better. Carefully insert the new seat in the passage way with the rings on the seat down toward the carb body. Slowly and carefully force the seat down with the back end of the drill bit. Once it is seated, check to see that it did not flip and the rings are up. Next check to make sure that the float does not have any liquid in it. If it does, replace. If everything looks correct, attach the new needle to the float and install with the float pin centered. It everything is correct, the float should seat level to the carb body, when looking at it upside down. If everything looks good reattach the float bowl, making sure that both the bowl gasket and the nut gasket seal properly. Reinstall on the engine and test unit. Remember to have patience and take your time. Good luck, but I don't think you'll need it.
PS: On the side of some Tecumseh carbs you will find a plastic cover. Under this cover will be an idle jet. Remove it and check to see that the jet is open both horizontally and vertically. You should be able to push the old float needle wire through the vertical opening.
 

markdoyle

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With that carb I would clean and rebuild it with carb kit number 801427 and new float number 801422. This is the procedure I use.
Needle and seat replacement.
Remove the carb, and then remove the float bowl. Check the float bowl jet (which is the bowl screw) and make sure the jets both horizontal and vertical are clean and open. Tip the carb upside down and remove the float pin and float with needle attached. Look in the float needle passage and you should see the red float seat at the bottom of the passage. This is where a #5 crotchet hook would come in handy as you need to remove this seat. If you have no hook, but compressed air, you can blow through the fuel inlet and try to pop the seat out. Put your thumb over the passage to prevent the seat from flying who knows where. No air or hook try bending a stiff paper clip to dig the seat out.
I would either give the carb a good 24 hour soaking or have it ultrasonically cleaned at this time.
With the seat out clean the passage way with carb cleaner. Now you must find a drill bit slightly smaller than the passage way, to be used to press in the new seat. Apply a very, very small amount of a very light lube to the new seat. 3-1 oil or lighter, to help seat it better. Carefully insert the new seat in the passage way with the rings on the seat down toward the carb body. Slowly and carefully force the seat down with the back end of the drill bit. Once it is seated, check to see that it did not flip and the rings are up. Next check to make sure that the float does not have any liquid in it. If it does, replace. If everything looks correct, attach the new needle to the float and install with the float pin centered. It everything is correct, the float should seat level to the carb body, when looking at it upside down. If everything looks good reattach the float bowl, making sure that both the bowl gasket and the nut gasket seal properly. Reinstall on the engine and test unit. Remember to have patience and take your time. Good luck, but I don't think you'll need it.
PS: On the side of some Tecumseh carbs you will find a plastic cover. Under this cover will be an idle jet. Remove it and check to see that the jet is open both horizontally and vertically. You should be able to push the old float needle wire through the vertical opening.
Wow - amazing - thank you so much - hopefully I can learn and pay it forward for someone else. Appreciated.
 
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