Straight shaft available for GT-225?

Sean2202

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Greetings,

A while back I was at my neighborhood dump and found a old Echo GT-225 trimmer (all grey) in the dumpster. It didn't look too bad and had compression so I brought it home. I found that the gas line was leaking and replaced it with a repower kit along with a primer bulb. it also needed a new trimmer head which I had a brand new one that I installed. It started right up and ran great and I use it quite often. This is my third Echo trimmer that I have. The other two are straight shafts.

My question is if there is a straight shaft available for this model? The motor has great power but the curved shaft to me is annoying. I have no problem pulling it all apart myself to install a straight shaft.

Thanks for any replies.
 

bertsmobile1

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Most shafts will swap strait over if they are the same diameter
So easy way is to see if you can swap one of your strait shafts with the bent one.
 

Romore

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X2 Easiest way would be to locate a trimmer with a pooched engine.
 

Sean2202

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X2 Easiest way would be to locate a trimmer with a pooched engine.
I have a bunch of old echo trimmers and parts at my work and will check diameters of shafts but I believe the GT-225 looks to be smaller.

These old Echos have been sitting for God knows how long? Some without plugs. Pulled one out the other day put a plug in it and some fresh gas and it fired right up. Might be hard to find a dead echo engine :)
 

TerraForte

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Well there is a reason why they cost more than a Craftsman.
Yep. The differences are pretty stark.

I've been dealing with a LOT of older "fixer-upper" equipment lately. My dad recently passed away, and he was a hoarder. I have the privilege of cleaning out his collection. At least 15-20 small engine tools in the garage or under a tarp in the yard.

With so many of them, most of them being nearly worthless, I just toss the Craftsman/Ryobi/Homelite stuff and do a rushed diagnosis on the Echo and Stihl stuff. Sometimes I entertain Poulan Pro or McCulloch stuff out of curiosity. On a lot of them the pull cord is broken or the ignition boot cut (which is a conundrum for me).

Pull the plug, check for spark. Spray starting fluid in. If it fires, it has a carb issue and I sell it as is.
An older GT-225 (oddly in mint condition, but at least 7-8 years old) was found in the garage. Looked almost never used. Buried in the back, so been sitting for years. Put gas in it, primed the bulb, started on the first pull.
Another Echo curved shaft trimmer (GT-2000, which is the older version of the Gt-225 and identical except for grey plastics) was back there too. But roughed up a bit. Dirty carb, but fired up on starting fluid. Sold as is.

The fundamentals of the Echo machines are always solid. Great cylinders/pistons. It's usually the peripherals - carb, recoil starter, or fuel lines maybe that give issue. Even the ignition coils seem robust.

Can't say the same for the other stuff...
Found a couple of Poulan Pro chainsaws in there, too. Really meaty saws. Like 54cc, 22" bars. These things are such dogs to work on. You spray starting fluid in the cylinder of an Echo and that sucker pops over IMMEDIATELY. With these Poulans, it's hit or miss. One time it fires over and runs for 3 seconds. The other time you're pulling on it 20 times over, and the 21st time it coughs again. So inconsistent.
The differences lie in the details - refinement of ignition timing, shape of intake, the muffler design, etc. All these details add up, and the non-Stihl/Echo stuff just ain't got it.

Another interesting note - In the rummage I found a "Homelite" chainsaw. A cutie - 33cc, 14" bar. But in quite good condition. The label was faint, but seemed to say "1999" emissions compliance. The side cover said "Homelite Powerstroke made by John Deere" ouuuu, fancy, huh?
Well, I guess JD is a good one (at least back then), too, because that saw started up immediately and ran great.
Not sure if the whole saw is made by JD, or just the motor. Motor ran great, but clearly a low-end saw. Oiler was clogged, but gushed when cleared up. Leaves puddle on ground when idling (my cheapo Echo doesn't). I cut a small limb just to humor myself. OMG - complete lack of vibration damping. Sold it immediately. What a beating that saw will give you if using for more than 5-7 mins. Other details such as knobs, linkages, tensioner, etc scream economy-grade.
 

primerbulb120

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As far as I know, all the GT-225s have smaller diameter shafts. I am not aware of any Echo straight shaft string trimmer that uses the same shaft size.

That said, the engine should swap on to an Echo PE-200 stick edger, as the PE-200 shaft is the same diameter as the GT-225.
 

JBtoro

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As far as I know, all the GT-225s have smaller diameter shafts. I am not aware of any Echo straight shaft string trimmer that uses the same shaft size.

That said, the engine should swap on to an Echo PE-200 stick edger, as the PE-200 shaft is the same diameter as the GT-225.
I picked up a GT-200R (grey, 2007-ish) & would like also to "upgrade" to a straight shaft if I can find one. With my caliper I measured the curved shaft diameter where it enters the power head & it appears to be 7/8" (.88/in.). That converts to 22.352 mm.

If anyone would be so kind as to measure the straight shaft diameter on a similar-generation grey Echo, I guess that would answer the "swap" question once & for all ... and I will be most grateful.
 

bogdaN

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I have old grey echo and measure shaft it is 1 inch.That is straight shaft.
 
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