Oil ingredient list

Scrubcadet10

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Does anyone know where you (I) can find data sheets on engine oils, like how man anti wear additives there are in PPM? I've been thinking about using Kinetix oil (Taryl mentioned) in air cooled engines since it has more zinc in it. The only proof i see of it having more zinc in it is the little Zinc periodic table symbol on the bottle.
 

bertsmobile1

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Scrubbie,
Firstly there is no list that is available to Joe Public and if there was you would need a PhD in molecular science to make heads or tails of it.
Secondly all of the formulations are trade secrets.
Probably better that 100 different Zinc containing molecules that could be used.
Which one gets used & how much is added and how much zinc that particular compound would make available and at what temperatures it works over will depend upon what else is in there and what the actual chemistry of the original crude was to start with.
Now I will really confuse you by telling you all metal compounds are abrasive and this includes zinc.
Plasterers use a white sand paper which is Zinc Stearate and dentist use several different zinc compounds to clean your teeth.
But the same compound is used in the cosmetics industry & the rubber industry as a lubricant
Zinc Oxide was a favourite abrasive blasting powder for gold & silversmiths.
Plastic moulding industry use it as a lubricant.
Cold metal extrusions use either a solid soap or glass powder as a lubricant.
 
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cpurvis

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Almost everything has a Safety Data Sheet (SDS; formerly MSDS). You can search for the SDS and see what you can find. It may tell you what you're looking for but sometimes they're very vague.
 

bertsmobile1

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FWIW oils, cutting fluids, suficants & lubricants was one 13 week unit of my 4 year degree.
It is 1/2 a unit for motor mechanics , a full year for avaition engineers and I think a 1/2 year unit for marine engineers
For me that was just enough information to enable me to understand that this is a very highly specialized field, best left to the experts.
I always find it amusing that 99.9999% of the people who wax lyrical about oil have no education about them at all and are relying an the rubbish they have seen on U-tube , face book, TV & radio.
If they had the faintest idea about how oils work they would not talk so much rubbish.
The killer is to ask them how detergents work ( it is on Wikki ) if they start to talk about dislodging build ups in your engine they you turn around an walk away they are FOOLS.
Even professional mechanics have troubles wrapping their heads around HOW oils work.
Most can identify things like lack of oil or boundary lubrication failure but ask then how the zinc actually gets between the surfaces and what keeps it there and you get blank faces.
And think about it, the zinc content is listed in ppm so even if it was 1000 ppm that would mean when 2 parts are in contact there can only be 10% of the contact faces separated by the zinc.
 

bertsmobile1

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Not really Tom.
Bob the oil guy seems reasonable but his mate is a bit suspect.
His very opening paragraph is at the best misleading and at worse wrong.
The original Babbitt was Sn:Sb:Cu but being patient was largely replaced by the Sn:pb:Sb which have a different microstructure to Issacc's original castable bearing.
Much latter on when we started to make them from scrap metal there was some copper contamination & they found small amounts of Cu were an advantage to the Sn:Sb:pb base metals
AFAIK the only babbitts that use copper were railway bearings which were cast in place and because of the much higher pouring temperatures are limited to large bearings that can be cooled
When we started to make slipper bearings then the Cu type babbit material became popular because the actual bearing was very thin and made externally to the journal that it was being used on.
However metallurgist do not consider Sn:pb:Cu alloys as babbitts as they have a different microstructure to the Sn:pb:Sb alloys

So when some starts with a parragraph that is a bit dubious it makes one a little iffy about the rest of the content where ones expertise is not as extensive.
 
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