Anyone else having electrical/starter switch issues with Toro Timecutter SS 4235 ??

packardv8

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For many years I had a 1990s Cub Cadet and eventually removed or replaced every OEM switch and wiring component.

It appears the same may be necessary with the new Toro. I can tell there is excessive voltage drop in the ignition/starter switch circuit. Sometimes the solenoid just clicks the first couple of tries and then eventually engages. Sometimes it is necessary to put a battery charger on the battery to get the switch to engage the solenoid. This is with a known good battery and all connections clean and tight.

Back to the Cub, over the ten years I owned it, the same symptoms presented and every safety switch, starter switch and PTO switch eventually had to be removed or replaced for the machine to reliably start and run. Is this also going to be necessary with a two-year-old Toro?

jack vines
 

Rivets

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I doubt that you have a switch problem. With the problem you describe, there are two things I would be checking before I would replace any parts. First, if the solenoid just clicks I would immediately test for battery voltage two ways. First static, everything off accross battery terminals, then dynamic accross the battery with the key in the start position. If both readings are 11.5V or better, battery is no the problem. If voltages are low your battery is not holding a charge or something is discharging it. May need to be replaced or find a short which is causing the discharge. If the battery is good, the second thing I would be checking are two grounds. Yes, I know that you say all connections are clean and good. The grounds I would check are the ground from the battery to the chassis. There are times when I have had to grind the paint off the chassis and terminal and then add a lock washer to make sure the connection stays good and tight. The second ground is the one going from the solenoid to the chassis. Your solenoid should be a four post solenoid and one of the small terminals goes to ground. If this ground goes through the wiring harness, add a second ground wire from the ground terminal on the solenoid to the chassis to make sure the solenoid is properly grounded.
 

packardv8

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Yes, cleaning the grounds is always good advice. The most recent late model vehicle I worked on has seven grounds from unibody to engine/electricals. That shows how important OEM engineers consider the grounds.

jack vines
 

packardv8

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IT WAS THE STARTER!

This problem has been going on for for the past three years; the Kohler Command 22hp starter has been a problem. I changed the battery, cleaned the cables, added grounds, set the valve adjustment. Some here said the solenoid was bad, some suggested the switch. Finally, last week it just refused to turn over. I removed the starter, disassembled it and couldn't find anything wrong. Brushes were OK, bearings and bendix didn't seem to be a problem. It would turn over the engine with the plugs removed, but not under compression.

Finally, I ordered another starter. Some research showed there is a better Kohler Courage starter and it is actually a couple of bucks less than the replacement Command. Came today, installed it with some minor wiring changes to accommodate the better starter and all is good to go.

Hard to believe, Kohler had a better starter on the shelf and sold us a piece of crap which fails within a couple of years of homeowner use. I wrestled with it for three years and wish I'd known to buy the good stuff in the beginning.

The starters on the single cylinder Kohlers on the two Cub Cadets I owned never gave a minute's trouble. The Cub Cadet wiring yes, but never a starter issue with the Kohler singles.

jack vines
 

Grandpop54

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I bought my Timecutter 4235 on 04/13/2013 and have had starter problems since the day I bought it. Bought it from Home Depot, and got the three year extended warranty. It was sent to several repair shops, with statement saying, “they could not find anything wrong.” The next time I tried cranking it, no crank. The starter solenoid acted like it was not engaging. Other shops would replace some parts, and then tell me it was good to go. Same problem after getting it back home. I am still having starter trouble to this day.
 

packardv8

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The starter system is a design flaw.

I replaced the OEM starter, which does not have a bearing at the top of the shaft, with one from a better Kohler which does. I don't have the part number handy, but a search of Kohler starters will bring up the good one which bolts on.

Regularly go through every connection under the seat. Scrape them clean, apply dielectric grease.

Yes, it's a PITA, but it ain't rocket science.

jack vines
 

Rivets

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First, your starting problem is not a Toro problem it is an engine problem. Second, you only have four major parts to a starting circuit; battery, switch, solenoid and starter. Those along with the PTO switch and safety switches make up the circuit. Yes, electrical problems can be a pain in the butt, and as stated, this is not rocket science and any tech worth their salt should be able to solve this problem. I don’t know the quality of techs you have gone to , but they must start with the basics That means that the battery is good, fully charged and the charging system is working properly. Then they must follow a systematic procedure to diagnose where the problem is. Don’t really need a tech, just someone who understands electricity and can follow a wiring schematic. Here is the procedure I use, you don’t have to post back with results, it just shows the steps I follow. If the problem has been going on for 6 years, you need to find better mechanics, you’re being taken by guys who don’t know what they’re doing.

[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Electrical* problems can be very easy or very difficult, depending on four things.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]1. * How well you understand basic electricity.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]2. *What tools you have and know how to use.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]3. *How well you follow directions.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]4. *You don't overlook or assume anything and verify everything.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Remember we cannot see what you are doing. *You are our eyes, ears and fingers in solving this problem. *You must be as accurate as you can when you report back. *The two basic tools we will ask you to use are a test light and a multi-meter. *If you have an assistant when going through these tests it would be very helpful. *These steps work the best when done in order, so please don't jump around. *Now let's solve this problem.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]First, check the fuse(s), check battery connections for corrosion (clean if necessary) and *voltage - above 12.5 volts should be good.*[/FONT][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Second, check for power from the battery to one of the large terminals on the solenoid. *One of the wires is connected directly to the battery and has power all the time so one of the large terminals should light a test light or show 12 volts on a meter at all times.*[/FONT][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Third, *check for power at the small terminal of the solenoid while depressing the clutch/brake pedal and holding the key in the start position (you may need an assistant to sit in the seat to override the safety switch). If your solenoid is a four wire solenoid, check both small wire terminals as one is ground and the other is power from the ignition switch. *If your solenoid is a three wire solenoid, make sure the solenoid body is not corroded where it bolts to the chassis of the mower as this is your ground path back to the battery. *If in doubt, remove the solenoid and clean the mounting area down to bare metal. *If there is no power to the small terminal then your problem is most likely a safety switch, ignition switch or in the wiring.*[/FONT][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Fourth, check for power on the other large terminal of the solenoid while holding the key in the start position q(you may need an assistant to sit in the seat to override the safety switch).*[/FONT][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Fifth, check for power at the starter while holding the key in the start position (assistant again).*[/FONT][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Sixth, check your ground circuit back to the battery.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]After you have gone through each of the above steps, let us know what happened when you did each step. *At that point we will have great info to tell you how to proceed. *Remember you are our eyes, ears, and fingers, so please be as accurate as possible.[/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Be as specific as possible with voltage readings as this will help diagnose your problem quicker. *If you do not know how to perform the above checks, just ask and I will try to guide you through it. *Youtube also has some videos and as you know a picture is worth a thousand words.[/FONT][/FONT]
 

7394

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My Toro 4260 I bought new in Aug, 20 2014 has been great.. (Knock on wood)..

I had to adjust the valves on the Kawasaki engine, once to date. Otherwise been a fine machine..
 
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