Black and Decker CS1518 Electric Chainsw Misbehaving

ctassell

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Hello Everyone,

I have a Black and Decker CS1518 electric chainsaw that has recently started to have starting issues. Basically, when I plug it in and fiddle with it for a bit it will start, and then I can cut fine until I release the trigger. After that, it's hard to get it started again. Basically it's just the matter of shaking it and constantly pressing the trigger/toggling the kick bar to get it going again. Sometimes it will restart, sometimes I just give up. I took it apart to check the electric switches as I've seen online that those are the most likely culprit, but they seem to test fine with a multimeter (continuity test) so I'm out of ideas. Anyone know what could be happening?
 

ctassell

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Yes, there was no sawdust or dirt in the motor compartment and not much in the gear area next to the chain.
 

dougand3

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Possibly the trigger switch is faulty - it closes the circuit some of the time and runs. Later, contacts move, circuit opens and no run. Another possibility is brushes are dirty or worn down so much that they are not making consistent contact with the copper plates around the armature. (This assumes brush motor). I'd try another switch to test.

https://servicenet.blackanddecker.com/Products/Detail/CS1518
Click Exploded Art to see the IPL.
 
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SeniorCitizen

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To test the switch, I'd likely be temporally wiring around it to eliminate it from the circuit. I don't mind spending money but I dislike wasting money on items I haven't determined to be the problem. If it ran every time I plugged it in to 120v 10 or 20 conservative times then we could maybe safely say, yes it's the switch.
 

dougand3

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Yeah, a "test" switch. Any Single Pole Single Throw switch rated at 15A 120VAC would work. Even a wall light switch.
Maybe you'll just find current switch is just corroded. After cleaning, it may close circuit consistently.
 

ctassell

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Hmm, I'll give that a try then. Would it be safe to just take the two leads off of the switch and touch them together when it's plugged in? I'm thinking that as long as I'm holding the wires by the insulated part it should be fine. Although I might have a switch from an old lawn mower that I can use...
 

dougand3

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Much better and less sparks a flying to have each lead firmly attached to a test switch. You want to test through many on/off cycles to see if trigger switch is bad.
 

ctassell

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Okay, will do. I imagine I can pick one up at radio shack or the like for cheap.
 

SeniorCitizen

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Hmm, I'll give that a try then. Would it be safe to just take the two leads off of the switch and touch them together when it's plugged in? I'm thinking that as long as I'm holding the wires by the insulated part it should be fine. Although I might have a switch from an old lawn mower that I can use...
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Rather than that approach I prefer to connect the 2 wires together with it UN-PLUGGED then use the receptical plugging in and out for the test. Another method is to use a power strip and switch for testing. I once made a pole saw for my electric and use a power strip fastened to the pole at the bottom. The saw switch up 20 ft. was a little far for me to reach.
 
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